…spring work

Hey!

I wanted to let you all know that I will be here through the spring working. Summer will be mostly family time, but Spring is an opportunity to set the refresh button and make your home crisp and clean. So, if there are projects that you’ve been putting off and would like help refinishing your old, brown pieces send me an image and I’ll give you a quote. My turn around is 2 weeks and I work mostly with Annie Sloan, as you know.

cbensten@blueeggbrownnest.com

I also have a full garage of items that I am going to be finishing up and selling at good prices so check in.

Loving you all!

Christen

 

…ukulele blue

Hey Guys! Whose ready for warm weather? ME, that’s who.

I feel like in order to put a room together you need to be in that space for a while to sort it out. We are not able to get to the lake as often as I would like so I try to play things out in my head. Originally, I was going to literally paint every itty-bitty thing white in the house – from flooring to stair rails to furniture. I halfway tried that. This piece below was one of the pieces that I painted white, but for months I could not finish it.

When I lose steam for a project it’s usually because it’s not right. I think I’m being influenced by all the color that I’m seeing out in the world. So. Much. Blue. Images that I’ve been drawn to look something like this:

I see so much texture and color and not everything is symmetrical. It feels comfortable and elegant. I’m really into it. So, I decided to try to incorporate the look into the main living space and it started with painting this console blue. It’s Napolonic Blue, but we call it Ukulele Blue based on, well, Reid’s ukulele that matches the color.

Yes, I need to scrape the glass. I also sanded down a white table that I painted early on because I wanted to expose some of the wood. I think natural wood works really well with this dark blue. It was a family affair to get it sanded.

And DH waxed for the first time!

I’m in love with how it turned out.

Lastly, I worked on a few smaller items – a little entry table and hanging some accessories. When doing a dark color, sometimes you need multiple coats. I used three on each of these blue pieces.

Love gold with blue. I framed this antique music many years ago with custom mats and think they work great here.

Feels better. Um, I think no curtains, DH.

Have you joined me over at Christen Bensten yet?  Come on over! Subscribe here. Connect here for social media.

 

…question from a struggling college student

I want nothing more than to help a struggling college student that cares about her kitchen table look! I received this email yesterday and am sharing it in the hopes that it helps others. I know there’s a lot of confusion about getting this weathered wood look.

“Hello I just watched probably 10 of your videos! I am moving into an apartment in Chicago and have recently picked up a round oak table at an estate sale. It is that awful yellow golden color. I really liked the video you did on the restoration hardware inspired white table. Eventually I want to get the soft comfy chairs to go around the table so my place looks comfy and cozy!

Question:

1. Do I have to use a sander in order to get that yellow color off before painting?

2. How much do I sand before I start painting?

3. And what number sand paper do I use?

If you could help me out in any way possible! Thank you.

Sincerely, a struggling college student haha” (Attached photo)

college student image

As you can see, what College Student (CS) has is your typical, dated, wood pedestal table. It looks like it is in great shape and a round table can work in so many spaces. In fact, DH and I bought a white round table for our first home and I still have it (even thought it is now used for kid’s crafts!) I think it’s always a good bet to buy a round table.

So, like I’ve said in the past, the biggest factor in getting your weathered wood look is that you MUST HAVE A TEXTURED WOOD. You will most likely see this kind of texture in older furniture that is oak. When I say texture, it means rubbing your hand on the surface and feeling ridges and lines. The reason you need these ridges is that this is where the paint will pool and the “non-ridge” part is where the paint will be lighter. This contrast is where you will get that beautiful, weathered look as you see below.

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CS, do you see how your table is shiny? I hate to tell you this, but it’s because it is not textured, it looks like there is a layer of poly over it. Even if you sanded this poly off, you still will not get these ridges and undulations that naturally come in oak. The closest you can come to getting this look would be to paint thinly on your table to try to achieve a contrast. I say this hesitantly because it may be hard for you to get the look that I know you want. But, you can get a pretty distressed look like on my kitchen table by painting this way. Paint thinly and then take your 100 grade sand paper and sand the edges to achieve this. I did not use any wax either so that it could continue to weather.

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I hate to disappoint with this information, but if I may, I do want to encourage you that you can still get a beautiful and dramatic look just by painting a round pedestal table. Here is one that I recently did myself.

IMG_9897

Also, until you can afford those comfy chairs that your referenced, I would also think about painting them. It looks like you have nice, solid wood chairs there and I have painting many similar ones for clients that turned out beautifully.

IMG_5139

I wish you all the best in creating the space you want. I am confident you will because you’ve already selected this set. This is just the beginning, College Girl! 🙂