…how to make a grainsack tablecloth

A traditional tea party usually has a tablecloth. I wanted to make my setting look a bit softer than just my wood table, but I did not want to change my style too much. I decided to look to the type of fabric that many DIYers turn to – drop cloths! That’s right. Canvas drop cloths that you find in the hardware store. They come in all sizes and are perfect for making pillows and table runners especially if you are going for that vintage look.

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I wanted my tablecloth to look like the expensive antique runner that I bought a few years ago.

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I purchased my canvas drop cloth online and washed & dried it about 5 times until it became worn and soft.

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Once it was the right texture, it was time to paint my grainsack lines.

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This required my master taper! DH!

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We stretched it out onto the floor and we took out our tape measure and painter’s tape.

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I tend to eyeball my measurements and even though this sounds like cheating, I actually get pretty close if not exact most of the time. DH, however, always measures and he’s very good at this tedious job.

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I wanted 2 parallel lines down the middle. This requires 3 pieces of tape to frame out the spaces for the paint.

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Once he was finished taping, it was time to paint. I recently did a custom color for a client and have fallen in love with it. I made extra for myself and wanted to use it for my tablecloth. I used a thin, angled brush and did two coats.

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This was the first time I used ASCP on fabric and I must say it worked really well. I went slowly and covered the fabric and then went back over it again so make it a solid color.

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I let it dry about an hour and then pulled up the tape very slowly. Sometimes when you peel painter’s tape too quickly and your paint has not dried all the way, it can streak and drip onto the bits where you don’t want paint.

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I was pleased with the result as was Ollie. Show off.

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Once I had my tablecloth it was time to work on setting the table for my tea! I wanted to expand on the blue color that I chose. I got my paint out once again.

Tomorrow: How to set a table with “your” color.

 

Comments

  1. christina larsen says:

    Cool project for a drop cloth. I love using drop cloths. I have used them to make slip covers for two of my chairs and pillows. I see a new project in my future. Just need another drop cloth…

  2. Donna Dell says:

    I’m going to try this! So cool! Thanks for posting.

  3. I love your new color creation. Will you reveal the mix? It almost looks like Duck Egg and French Linen?

  4. Joann Belcher says:

    I love it. Good job, can’t wait to try it.

  5. Love it and the color. Is that Provence mixed with Paris or Chateau Grey?

  6. Please tell us about the color! Also, do you have to heat set it or wash it before using? Thanks, I always look forward to reading your blog.

  7. Tammy Davis says:

    You have single-handedly solved my curtain delima! I’m going to paint the drop cloth curtains I already have with a pattern! Now I’m on the hunt for the perfect stencil. I’m so excited. Of course I’ll be making a tablecloth while I’m at it. How do you think this will hold up in the wash? Not at all I’m guessing since the paint washed out of my clothes. Thanks so much! I love your site, you have given me so much inspiration! And the courage to follow my passion. Now if only I could make myself marketable in a community of women/people who prefer to learn how to do it themselves.

    …Is there anyway you would consider sharing your “custom color” recipe? Pretty please?

  8. Hi Christen!

    Amazing cat!…and tablecloth!

    Pam

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